The Creative Struggle

A killer intro; a mandatory aspect of any great literary piece.

That’s what I aim for, but sometimes I can go through loads of intros before I settle on “the one”.
Other times I just give up and move on to other distractions…ever hoping for a bulb to light up amid the chaos.

Deciding on what to write isn’t the problem, but creating that perfect intro cripples my creative spunk. It is the “easiest” to put together but the hardest to craft and master.

I am not a perfectionist…but I do try my best.

It is indeed gut-wrenching to find readers skip past the intro that kept you up many a sleepless night. This is my umpteenth attempt at this intro, but who is counting, right?

I break my squishy brain for the “perfect intro” and no one reads it.

SIGH!

My creative foibles aside, this little predicament raises a concern that haunts creatives the world over: the infamous “Creative Block”.

If you find yourself in the creative sphere – writers, musicians, performers, artists –  then you know how far-reaching this “block” really is.

It is a deep pit of despair from which only the determined can escape…and mind you, the act (of escaping) may last for days, weeks, months or even years.

When you lose your muse, you better put on the best show of your life to win her back, or in the very least, break down every door known to man until she’s nestled safely in your arms once again.

Being creative isn’t the cakewalk some claim. Sure, it might come easy to some but the truth hits hard when you realize even the best of the best plunge headfirst into the “block”.

It comes with the territory and quite normal to wander its labyrinthine maze on occasion.
Heck! It took me quite a while to put this post together, so yeah…it is a global epidemic.

For some though, getting out of the “block” can be as easy as staring at a blank page for 3 straight days…or as daunting as seeking inspiration from someone else’s works.
Inspiration does works: I do it often, although my case requires I stare at random images till the lazy brain hamsters start showing their worth – they are quite the lazy lot.

But where does “getting inspiration” end and “stealing’ begin?

A creative mind is oft lauded and appreciated, even when most don’t know the hardships (and headaches) such a mind endures. We love the creative people who have made an enviable living out of selling the crazy and innovative ideas scurrying around in their heads…and some of us hope to someday walk beside them, or better yet, ahead of them.

But how can we push boundaries and break down restrictive molds if we forgo our ability to think and glaringly steal ideas?

People are fierce at stealing ideas, but for today’s lesson we will focus on Ghana and her many green-eyed citizens. I know you’d all love to see me point just one finger at Kofas (a Ghanaian movie director) and watch him run into hiding again, but that won’t be fair to him.

The sad truth? This sin of intellectual thievery goes beyond Kofas’ blunder; it is a canker in Ghana’s creative sphere that just won’t die (T1000).
Ghana’s creative industry is actually not as competitive as those in western countries, but the breakneck speeds at which content – videos, music and pictures – is pushed to the public opens up a very big avenue to steal intellectual properties with us none-the-wiser.

Local production houses steal entire movies – foreign and local – and then repackage them as new.
In an industry where a single production house can shoot 4 full movies in a week with barely any script, we should not be surprised if new movies recycle plot from old movies.
Heck! Even Hollywood is doing that…so why not Ghana.

That much content in such short a span negates the need for brainwork for some creative individuals in Ghana. A few put up a valiant effort, but like moths to a flame, they embrace the system: recycle and steal…because no one cares.

Kratos in the North and Mortal Kombat in bushes.

Just so you know, Kratos speaking Dagbani is as weird as it sounds…

Image result for kofas

From the Shadows

When Kofas and his merry band of actors announced John & John, a movie that bears an uncanny resemblance to Skeem, I doubt they were ready for the backlash that was to follow.

All things considered though, Kofas’ “remake” of Skeem could have gone unnoticed if both movies had been obscure:
BUT NOPE! They were as high-profile as they come, with Skeem benefiting from the publicity and media coverage that comes from being critically acclaimed.

John & John, a blatant and unrepentant copy of Skeem could have been a remarkable hit in Ghana, if Kofas’ folly had not reared its head.

He has since gone into hiding, but this blight on his record invariably calls into question his prior endeavors…and that is a shadow I fear he might never pull away from.

I would like to think this issue would educate the creative public in Ghana about intellectual thievery…but I fear I might be asking for too much, considering the first presidential speech from President Nana Akufo-Addo lifted passages from the speeches of former presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush.

What can I say? It’s in our blood.

 

NB: Go here for a surprise.

Review: Ebo Whyte’s “One Million Pounds”.

Pounds shterling

Not a lot of people like stage plays and that’s not surprising. In this world where so many of us have been desensitized by movies and TV shows, a stage play is one of the last true forms of pure expressionism…but almost forgotten.

Theatre might be fading away but until then, it has and will always captivate audiences with thrilling stories and deep real-time characterizations; something the other dramatic art forms can’t replicate or deliver.

The venerable Uncle Ebo Whyte is hailed in Ghana (and abroad) as the singular and greatest playwright this generation has seen. With all the plays and accolades to show, Uncle Ebo Whyte is a powerhouse indeed…but prior to my viewing of his latest play, One Million Pounds, I had not seen any of his previous plays.
My colleagues consider that unforgivable.
So guess what I did when I got a free ticket?
Yup! I got my butt off my office chair and into a comfy seat in National Theatre.

I’ve heard nothing but great things about Uncle Ebo Whyte’s plays…especially from my “workplays” and since I was new to the world of Uncle Ebo Whyte, I went in there expecting a lot but open enough as not to be too critical.
It was my first time after all and with no actual frame of reference, aside the emphatic praise from my colleagues, I indeed had to keep a very open mind.

I think I’ve nailed the intro, so let’s get to it:
Pièce de résistance.

 

The Review –

“One Million Pounds is an inspiring stage-play that tells a story of what happened when four talented Ghanaians embark on a journey of a lifetime to partake in the maiden edition of a contest that may be the key to their success.”
It is a story of determination, sticking it to the “man” who wants to put you down and never giving up…even in the face of severe adversities.

This story, whiles simple, highlights a lot of issues plaguing the African society.
I won’t spoil much in the way of the story but what I will say is, it blends a lot of themes and issues that have unfortunately become the best descriptors for Africa; Bribery, Corruption and Sabotage.

Money has led many astray and it always has a way of crippling the hearts of the most well-intentioned individuals. Businesses fall and relationships die…and in One Million Pounds, the four talented Ghanaians (Jama) experience firsthand what money can do to a man when their manager sells them out.

This all feels like something you might have read in the newspapers, and that is so because, it is commonplace in Ghana and Africa. So when one goes to watch something with such a troubling but true theme, one would expect to come away from the play with a renewed sense of patriotism and ‘un-corruptness’.
Nope! I got none of that.
It did nothing to engender me to do something about it and I left the same way I came; apathetic.

On the other hand, there were a lot of encouraging statements from the casts, but at this point it is something viewers have come to expect…so there are no real surprises there.

“Don’t give up on your dreams…and such.” – Normal Stuff.

The story is by no mean an intelligent one but I’ve got to cut Uncle Ebo Whyte some slack since he aims to write plays the general public can easily relate to.
No need to write an intellectual story that might fly over the heads of audiences.
That’s not to say Ghanaians are dumb but that’s the picture local movies and TV shows paint all the time;
All fluff and no substance.

There’s the straight-shooting hero, his love interest, the unreliable friend, the obnoxious villain and the issues that will miraculously get resolved in the end. Watching this play elicits a strong sense of Déjà vu; typical plot points and typical conflicts.

“This is where it gets ugly!”

The simplicity inherent in the story carries through to every part of the play.
If one is hailed as the best playwright this side of the continent and with competition virtually nonexistent, then it’s no surprise for such an individual to rest on his laurels and get complacent.

There’s nothing breathtaking about the play, and after watching it, the only thing that hurriedly comes to mind was the very obnoxious “Cliff” (or the person playing that character).
Cliff, an eccentric Caucasian Brit, shrieked through his lines…barely making anything he said understandable.
It was utterly unintelligible and grating to the ear and apparently, audiences didn’t like it either.
So it makes me wonder if the actors rehearse with microphones or not…because if they do, they should have heard  his banshee-like screeches but if they realized and still went ahead with his deafening squeals, then it is safe to say they wanted us deaf.

The play left little to the imagination and it was delivered bare-boned with nothing mind-stimulating about it.
Ladies and Gentlemen, let the brain-hamsters rest a while because there’s no need for them here.
Those looking for something a little more on the clever-side should lower their expectations.

The story, although nice, offered nothing new to the primary issues it tackles. This isn’t a masterfully crafted tale but a story I believe will be a weak entry from Uncle Ebo Whyte.
Some scenes were too drawn out…and I ended up playing with my phone (doing nothing) far often than I liked.

The venerable Uncle Ebo Whyte looking very dapper.

The venerable Uncle Ebo Whyte looking very dapper.

I did love the acting though.
As far as acting, theatre is the way to go…and the cast in One Million Pounds did a stellar job…save for Cliff (or the guy playing the character). It did get hammy in some scenes but that is something that can be overlooked bearing in mind these are actors and actresses new to the Roverman roster.
It is always refreshing to see such talent in Ghana…considering the terrible actors we have on the big screen.

It was the singing that partially marred the otherwise perfect acting experience for me. Some were OK but others were abysmal…especially when trying to hit the higher notes.
The voices strained a lot and I cringed about as often…and sometimes I couldn’t hear what was being sung.

During the singing sessions, lyrics to the songs would be projected on the walls for the audience.
It is a novel idea that should have fixed the issue of not hearing what was being sung…but even that had some inconsistencies.
During the musical numbers, either the projected lyrics will trail behind the singer or run ahead like Oscar Pistorius escaping from prison…forcing me to think this is something Roverman hasn’t quite mastered. But after seven years of being in business (theatre), some mistakes are just awful to behold…even if they don’t ruin the experience for some.

Uncle Ebo Whyte has “perfected” his craft and to say he is just a great writer would be a great disservice to him but sometimes throwing nice words around to flatter comes at a cost of pure honesty…so I will suck it up and put it out there.
The humor in One Million Pounds is the kind I’ve come to expect; safe jokes.
“Nothing naughty here.”
Safe jokes, according to my definition, are the kind that appeal to the masses.
Jokes everyone will laugh to…and the bad thing about safe jokes is, they are rarely clever.
You don’t have to think hard (or at all) to get it…and that is the kind prominently featured in the play.
Not once did an esoteric joke ‘break out”.

I sat through the entire play without laughing.
Not even a little.

That’s not to say the jokes are bad. No…people laughed their heads off and I even smiled occasionally but I found nothing remotely clever about the jokes.

Uncle Ebo Whyte, I’m not saying you have to litter your plays with esoteric jokes…but do throw one in there once in a while, so the people who appreciate such jokes would know you are thinking about them too.
I know I would.

On the topic of humor, not all the jokes were funny though, and I particularly found one joke to be in very poor taste…especially coming from Uncle Ebo Whyte.
The character Cliff wears a shoulder-level wig and is quite eccentric…as previously stated.
In one scene he makes a risqué statement to a female cast member and as expected, she gets riled up and slaps the fool…but something happens; his nose falls off.

Obviously, Uncle Ebo Whyte is taking jabs at the late Michael Jackson, who was alleged to have had a fake nose. It was in bad taste…and as such, few people laughed (although I believe they didn’t get the joke.)

Trending issues in the country are also touched on in the play. Like the president’s new name and Obinim’s animal transformations…but even though it was fun to hear these things in the play, once again, they were not used as cleverly as one would expect.
The inclusion of these jokes felt forced…and added only to make the play seem current and ‘hip’.

roverman-logo

 

In Conclusion

Creativity can get stifled sometimes when you either keep doing the same thing or get stuck in a rut…or expecting a breakthrough when there’s nothing actively pushing that next level of creativity.
Uncle Ebo Whyte may not be hogtied to either one but if this is what I’m to expect from all plays written and executed by him, then I have to further reduce my expectations if I am to truly enjoy his work.

In the end, “One Million Pounds” is just another play easily forgotten not for lack of great actors and actresses…but because it tells an unremarkable story.
The acting was topnotch, the musical numbers hit or miss and the moral values uninspiring.

Diehard fans will appreciate it no matter what…but for new recruits like myself, One Million Pounds isn’t worth the price of admission.
★★☆☆☆ (2/5)

‘INTERCEPTION’ MOVIE REVIEW (ALMOST SPOILER-FREE)

A tentative step into the right direction

A tentative step in the right direction.

2015 was a great year for blockbuster movies…and boy what a year it was. From the ridiculous stunts in Furious 7 (RIP Paul) to the untamed force in Star Wars, 2015 didn’t disappoint us.
Some failures did pop up once in a while (Hitman and Pan) to remind us Hollywood can still churn out garbage when it wants.

“Pleasing both ends of the spectrum.”

All-in-all, the international movie scene treated us very well but I can’t say the same for Ghanaian movies…and it also doesn’t help that, anytime I hear “Ghana Movie” Kwadwo Nkansah comes to mind.
That guy is everywhere but I can’t fault him; he doesn’t want to end up like Egya Koo (took me a while to remember his name)…but someone has to tell him to slow down.

Ghana is doing its best to release international-standard movies and Interception is…well…it is something new…A new experience for me.

I don’t like Ghanaian movies and that is absolutely no surprise. My reason is very simple; they are plain boring.
So, after my big brother watched it at the Takoradi premiere, he was somewhat impressed and that blew my mind…hence, I also decided to give it a try.
My brother did tell me to watch it with a pinch of salt though, but I think I went in there with a barrel.

So after 100 minutes of interception, here comes my review.

PLEASE NOTE: my review will be in two flavors.
One review is what I think of the movie as a Ghanaian and the other as a critic.

This should be fun.

GHANAIAN FLAVOR

I like the movie, the action was nicer than what I’ve seen thus far in Ghana, the story was simple enough for the masses and the overall direction was quite good.
I’ll recommend this movie to almost every Ghanaian out there desperately looking for something new and a chance to break away from the “LilWin” monotony.
It really is a breath of fresh air.

★★★★☆ (4/5)

 

CRITIC (TRUE) REVIEW

Interception is an inconsistent mess from start to finish and the reason is very simple; it tried to do too much and it failed more than it succeeded. I won’t fault the guys behind the movie for trying though, but if you want to take a crack at something new, you’ve got to at least make sure you have a handle on it first.

Don’t go performing multiple magic tricks when you can’t even pull a rabbit out of a hat.

The problems with this movie starts from the opening scene and ends with the credits. From acting to story, this movie is rife with inconsistencies.

Let’s start from the top, shall we?
Like most mainstream action movies, the opening sequence aims to draw in the audience. It is a chance to wow and give the viewing audience a taste of what’s to come.
Sometimes it’s great and other times it is just bad.
Interception started off great but three things held it back;
bad acting, bad acting and bad acting.
The sad thing is, these “three” elements, along with other issues, run through the entirety of the movie.

To watch a movie of this caliber and see such terrible acting is a shame…but that is the case with A-list movies in Ghana.
That’s not to say Interception is only filled with bad actors. There are great actors in there who go all out (as far as their acting chops can carry them) but the rest on the other hand are the deliver-my-lines-like-a-toddler kind of actors…and it is oh so bad.

It is the kind of acting you’d expect from an X-Rated movie and not from a movie of this “class”.
The kidnapper in the opening scene is one of many bad actors in the movie and OH MY GOODNESS…there are many.

It just makes you wonder what they look out for in an actor during auditions (if they even have auditions).
It is either they hand over the role to a family/friend or look out for just anyone who can read, avoid the camera and not ask for a lot of money. It has to be one of these reasons.

Every attempt on my part to get lost in the world of interception was destroyed by these Z-Class actors.
There are terrific actors and actresses all around…but the people behind interception were too lazy to look.

Moving on!
The main story barely holds the movie together and it is actually quite surprising to realize that, in a movie categorized as an action-thriller, it was the romance between John Dumelo and Jasmine Baroudi’s characters that really stood out. It was the only part of the movie that genuinely grabbed my attention (somewhat).
The conversation was almost natural and the on-screen chemistry between the two was present…the only sad part was how abruptly it all ended. It makes me think Nina Lalwani, the writer of the story, didn’t have the time to properly resolve their story or she didn’t know how to.
It is a problem that features prominently in her story; she left so many things up in the air and expected us not to care because, as everyday-movie-goers it is our job to immediately forget about all the plot holes.

Picture this: Ama Abrebese’s character, the girlfriend of the main villain, revealed to the police she was aware of the villain’s dealings and even provided a private jet so they could travel around the world conducting their nefarious businesses. After this revelation/confession she avoids persecution and goes back home because her father is a powerful person (in another country).
She wasn’t extradited to face trial in her home country or anything…she walked away a free person.
As I think about it, I think they should have categorized Interception as “Action-Thriller-Fairytale”.

Nina Lalwani’s story is a very basic one and anyone looking for something a little more intelligent would be sorely disappointed. There are so many elements she could have thrown in there to spice up her story but I believe she didn’t want to expend too much of her brain power.

I’d have to commend the team behind the fight scenes and the gunplay. It was a delight to finally see some Hollywood-style fight sequences in Ghanaian movies…although it went on for too long.
When you start checking your watch during a fight scene in a movie then there is something very wrong somewhere.
The fight scenes weren’t bad…but JEEZ! How many hits to the head does it take for a bad guy to go down?

“No life insurance for bad guys I guess!”

Steady aim? I think not.

Steady aim? I think not.

The gunplay was great…but there is something very unnatural about shooting a gun without any bullet casings falling out or being ejected. If as a final decision, the team behind the movie went with “after effects” to simulate gunfire, why then couldn’t they have used the same process to add the ejected bullet casings?

“If you aim for realism, go for it.
Don’t make us question it.”

In conclusion, Interception is a fluff movie on every level. Pay even a sliver of attention and the huge cracks start to show…but if you truly want to enjoy this movie, I suggest shutting off your brain for about 100 minutes, because zoning out is the only way to enjoy it.

There are too many things that take you out of the experience and that is not a good thing for a movie with this many problems.
You forgive one mistake and before you recover from the previous blunder, something else pops up…and that is a trend in Interception.

In the end, interception tried to blend too many genres with marginal success.

★★☆☆☆ (2/5)

 

NB: All things considered, interception was a nice effort…I just don’t believe it took 2 years to make though.
3 – 6 months? Maybe.
2 years? No way.

PS: Oh yeah…Jeffery Forson, as an actor I believe you need more facial expressions.
The scowl and the smile gets old pretty fast.

Gasmillah is a cheapskate (AKA…Stingy or Chisel)

I’ve never been one for Ghanaian local music; it is instrumentally monotonous, lyrically bland and totally devoid of any emotion. Ghanaian musicians have a proclivity for following the guy ahead but never really forging a unique path. Thus, the Ghanaian music scene is cluttered with very generic and same-sounding songs from all genres.
…to each his own right?

My stance on this subject won’t change…but there’ve been some few songs that have drawn out my inner Ghanaian…and one such song is Gasmilla’s Telemo.
To be quite honest, Telemo is a real joy to listen to but mostly because of its chorus.
The rest of the song isn’t half bad but it is the chorus that kept reeling me in.
It is nothing remarkably extraordinary but what can I say, it makes me wanna sing along;
If any musician can achieve that in any song, then that is a win in my books.

Moving on; prior to listening to Telemo I knew practically nothing about Gasmilla…(I believe we’ve established I’m a hermit)…but after a rather short search on the internet, I found all I needed about the Telemo Man.
Apparently he has been around far longer than I first thought, released other hit songs (3 points) and is somehow an alumnus of Wesley Grammar.

Gasmilla

“Hard work and Determination really does pay off”

After the success of Telemo (plus the fame), Gasmilla has been wounding people with a GH¢40,000 – GH¢80,000 appearance/performance fee.
Is that outrageous? Maybe.
Does he deserve it? Ummm…probably, but I guess it is his sworn duty as a sane Ghanaian musician to make as much money possible before his Telemo train grinds to a halt…because, unlike Sarkodie, a lot of Ghanaian musicians desperately try to stay financially afloat with their one-hit-songs. When the buzz fades away, they try recapturing the lightning in their bottles but when that doesn’t work, they either go into hiding with what’s left of their money or reinvent their music careers; Shatta Wale anybody?

Anyway, Gasmilla is making it “big” but his recent attempts at creating another hit song have so far been middling…but hey, he’s trying. I can’t fault him for that.

Now, on the 31st of October 2015, Gasmilla was invited to the Wesley Grammar Homecoming celebrations and was made a celebrity judge at the Talent Show.
After a very bizarre dance-off between four groups, the winner was picked.
Oh yeah…they danced off to Telemo.
I bet you didn’t see that coming.

IMG-20151025-WA003

The Wess-G HomeComing.

It was at this point Gasmilla irreparably broke my heart. He went up to the stage, sang a very off-key line from the Telemo chorus and then delivered a not-so-charismatic speech.
It went a little something like; “I admire talent and I always try my best to invest into the lives of anybody talented. It is because of this I’m giving GH¢200 to the winners.”
(Paraphrased…but very accurate.)

Obviously, the kids were excited (no surprises there) but I was so shocked I lost some (a lot) respect for Gasmilla.
I wonder how much he would have invested if he thought they didn’t have talent.
In this economy what can GH¢200 do?
Maybe they can get matching socks. That way we can easily tell they are all from one dancing group.
Or maybe get a celebratory fufu from Aunty Mansah’s chopbar.

GH¢40,000 – GH¢80,000 a show and our magnanimous Mr. Gasmilla dishes out GH¢200?
Unless he’s mismanaging his money, he has no excuse and quite honestly, GH¢200 is an insult.

“All os a fudden”, Telemo angers me every time I hear it.

Gasmilla, I’ve never been a fan and if I were, I’d chase you around town with a signpost reading, “You are a cheapskate!!”
Be a better role model and don’t be cheap.

Thank You.

PS: …You just know the kids won’t see a pesewa of that GH¢200.

NB: It appears Gasmilla is trying to make amends for his folly with “Gasmilla Father Christmas Show”.
The premise of this “show” is pretty simple; “put smiles on the faces of little children on the 26th of December, 2015 (Boxing Day).”
Children who participate in the games (held at Efua Sutherland Park) will win prizes ranging from bicycles to T-shirts…with one lucky child winning a scholarship to any school desired. Whether that child has the brains or not is completely up in the air.
For all its worth, I am glad he is “giving back” to society…even though he is gonna demand a gate fee for the “Christmas Show”.
Such irony.

‘The Martian’ in Global Cinemas.

Global-Cinemas_Logo_Final-01

So I recently watched “The Martian” in 3D in Global Cinemas (Weija) and it was spectacularly awesome. I will give my very short review in a bit, but first let me pat Global Cinemas on the back.

They are doing a very good job and this boy is impressed.

They’ve taken the best ingredients of the killer cinema experience, mixed it up and well…brewed up the “killer cinema experience”.
They’ve got the location, the price (that hits the sweet spot right on the jaw), the great service, the sound, the 3D…and did I mention the sound?

Gosh I love the sounds in the cinema.

So, Global Cinemas. Chances are you haven’t heard much about them and if you have, good on you because, aside their severely unimaginative billboards I heard practically nothing about them. That basically means one of two things; either I am a reclusive hermit or Global Cinemas didn’t pump enough money into advertising. For the sake of argument, let’s just say the latter is the reason for my lack of knowledge.

Unless there’s a law in Ghana that limits advertising for movie houses, I don’t see why Global Cinemas is flicking around glass marbles when a powerhouse like Silverbird is dropping metal balls.

“Global Cinemas, never underestimate the power of advertising…in whatever shape or form.”

Let’s leave it at that. Hopefully, they will come for my services. I work for an advertising agency y’know! *Subtle Suggestion* **wink**

Anywho, Global Cinemas has now taken root in Functions (Weija), the same building that once housed Silverbird. They (Silverbird) left Functions because of West Hills and almost a year down the line, I’m glad they did.

With Global Cinemas now in charge of the outfit, the interior and exterior have seen some slight changes. On the exterior, there’s now a “Global Cinemas” nameplate and a new entrance. Nothing too shabby.
Step inside though and you will soon realize Global Cinemas wants to cozy you up.
To put it subtly, there’s a lounge in the lobby now, and whiles that might not seem like a big deal, you should know the previous occupants offered no sitting area (save for the videogame area) for waiting customers.

This invariably drove out the very patient customers into the clutches of neighboring fast-food restaurants…and these restaurants will gladly let you sit and wait only after you’ve placed an order.

“Hmmm! In hindsight, I guess it was a fruitful “partnership”.

Talking about fast-food restaurants around Global Cinemas…well, let’s just say they are not in short supply; from Starbites to Wichburger, there’s a place for almost everyone.

So all things considered, I think the lounge is a welcome addition even though I doubt I’ll ever need it, since I am an on-the-dot kinda guy.

The service isn’t bad either although I fear employee-complacency might ruin that part of the experience. This happens way too often in Ghana.

“A new place opens and all the attendants can’t stop smiling at you or fussing all over you…like a bunch of guys fawning over a fresh girl in a new school.
A few months down the road though and no one cares about you or what you want; they will serve you when they serve you…so chill out!”

I am not calling doom on Global Cinemas but no surprises here when that happens.
We are in Ghana after all.

INTO THE CINEMA
The structure of the cinema itself hasn’t changed and I don’t know if that is good or bad, so mum’s the word.

One area has changed though, and that is the sound.

It might be new speakers, different equalizer presets or a mere volume increase. All I’ll say is ‘Global Cinemas, thank you for whatever you did’.

When Silverbird once occupied the place, I’d always complain about the sound…heck! I still do (West Hills and Accra Mall).
It was too tame, too subtle and way too flat. It almost felt as though they didn’t want us to enjoy the movie. Their sounds never reached cinema-level awesomeness.
Global Cinemas on the other hand is trying to blow out and destroy your eardrums…and I love it. That is how it is supposed to be.

Bad movie or not, I want to exit a cinema knowing I got my monies worth and that is what Global Cinemas accomplishes with the sounds.

With that said, the overall cinematic experience of Global Cinemas is but a few fist pumps away from perfection and since perfection is an elusive unicorn, we better let it go and jump into the negatives plaguing Global Cinemas.

“Time for the negatives! I love me some negatives.”

 

As good as Global Cinemas is at the moment, they have some issues desperately begging for attention and the biggest offender is their lackluster movie lineup.

There’s only so much good pricing and exceptional sound can do, and the sad thing is, Global Cinemas isn’t doing much to impress us (as far as movies are concerned).
Yeah you will find a blockbuster movie in there once in a while…but take out that movie and the lineup gets severely anemic.

“I speak for a lot of people when I say we need more blockbuster movies.”

If it’s a battle of movie rights, beat Silverbird; it’s that simple.

Variety is the spice of life but in this case, variety gives Global Cinemas more customers and more money.

Next on my list of negatives is the uneven shades in the projection screen (in the 3D screening room). It is a minor niggle at best but it’s something that can’t be unseen…and once you are aware, it detracts from the entire experience.
More so for a 3D movie where the entire movie experience is predicated on the viewer thinking they are a part of it. The illusion is thus broken when the viewer is always conscious of the uneven nature of the screen. It is very jarring. It needs to be fixed pronto.

All these issues are easily fixable (by my reasoning), so if after a week or two I find them still present, disappointment will sink in.

So that’s that for Global Cinemas; Great place, great ambiance, great pricing…just beef up your movie lineup, fix your uneven projection screen and presto, all will be well.

Now, let’s do my review of The Martian…but you know what, go watch it and we will discuss it. Hehe :).

Let me know when you are done.

PS: The Global Cinemas’ website and mobile app feel broken. Empty pages, really old movie posters and broken links are the ones I care about…and yeah, a portion of the website leads to Silverbird’s promotions page (click on any of the three squares).
Jeez Global Cinemas, you can do better.