AIRTEL, WHY DO YOU HATE ME?

I don’t go looking for trouble…unless it comes begging, and neither do I sit still when it speeds at me.

Airtel probably didn’t get the memo, so they decided to play with my “Cellular Life” from the 5th of February to the 12th of February 2016.
Maybe they use a different calendar from the rest of us so their 1st April started on 5th February…but even so, April Fool’s day is at most a day’s long activity.
So Airtel, why did you play with me for a week?

What am I talking about?
Airtel “Temporarily Suspended” my phone number for one week…and their reason;
“We don’t know!”
It was bad enough my line was blocked but why do you not know what caused it?
…and why did it take 6 days to fix?
Well, it isn’t totally fixed…because even though I can now make and receive calls, I can’t send sms or receive them.
It is never that easy when it comes to resolving problems in Ghana.

Three times the people at Airtel told me the problem had been fixed but it wasn’t.
At one point, I could only receive calls but could do nothing from my side.
Well, if I’m to look at it that way then I guess it was a victory on their part…cos now I can make calls.
I guess they figured I don’t need sms.
A bloke with a smartphone don’t need no archaic method of communication.

 

ONE WEEK WAHALA (wahala = pandemonium)

Two days in, I realized I had to get a new sim. That was to be expected, but the calls I missed pissed me off to no end. Aside the normal and business calls I have come to expect, there were other more important calls I just had to receive.
I placed an item on sale on Tonaton and I needed it gone that weekend (5th – 7th).

I was so flustered with my Airtel wahala, I forgot to replace the “dead” number with the new one I purchased…and it wasn’t until Monday, the 8th February, the thought occurred to me.
My buyer probably called but as I’ve established, there was no way I could have received it…and I can’t find out who called during my exile.

I am tempted to sue…but they will just throw around a lot of disclaimers we the end-users have never seen before. Also, I don’t know any lawyers nor do I have the money to hire one.

Thinking my old sim had been decommissioned for good, I called a lot of my friends and business folks informing them I had acquired a new mobile number…only to call them back with my old line that it was a false alarm.

If this is how Airtel repays loyal customers, then I’m going back to Kasapa…wait…ummm…Expresso…wait wait…Sudatel…wait…screw this. Bottom line is, I’m leaving you.
I know it’s Valentine’s Day but I’m certain you’ll get over me.

In the end, did Airtel single me out? I don’t know…but the fact is, Airtel services have been dreadful for a very long time now, so I know for certain I am not the only one facing this problem…nor am I the only one with an axe to grind.

NB: Airtel stole GHC1 of my credit on my “dead” sim.
I don’t even want to get into that…they’ll just say it was a service charge.

PS: And GLO, go back to where you came from. No one wants you here, can’t you tell?
You are like a venereal disease; No one wants you…but you just won’t go away!

‘INTERCEPTION’ MOVIE REVIEW (ALMOST SPOILER-FREE)

A tentative step into the right direction

A tentative step in the right direction.

2015 was a great year for blockbuster movies…and boy what a year it was. From the ridiculous stunts in Furious 7 (RIP Paul) to the untamed force in Star Wars, 2015 didn’t disappoint us.
Some failures did pop up once in a while (Hitman and Pan) to remind us Hollywood can still churn out garbage when it wants.

“Pleasing both ends of the spectrum.”

All-in-all, the international movie scene treated us very well but I can’t say the same for Ghanaian movies…and it also doesn’t help that, anytime I hear “Ghana Movie” Kwadwo Nkansah comes to mind.
That guy is everywhere but I can’t fault him; he doesn’t want to end up like Egya Koo (took me a while to remember his name)…but someone has to tell him to slow down.

Ghana is doing its best to release international-standard movies and Interception is…well…it is something new…A new experience for me.

I don’t like Ghanaian movies and that is absolutely no surprise. My reason is very simple; they are plain boring.
So, after my big brother watched it at the Takoradi premiere, he was somewhat impressed and that blew my mind…hence, I also decided to give it a try.
My brother did tell me to watch it with a pinch of salt though, but I think I went in there with a barrel.

So after 100 minutes of interception, here comes my review.

PLEASE NOTE: my review will be in two flavors.
One review is what I think of the movie as a Ghanaian and the other as a critic.

This should be fun.

GHANAIAN FLAVOR

I like the movie, the action was nicer than what I’ve seen thus far in Ghana, the story was simple enough for the masses and the overall direction was quite good.
I’ll recommend this movie to almost every Ghanaian out there desperately looking for something new and a chance to break away from the “LilWin” monotony.
It really is a breath of fresh air.

★★★★☆ (4/5)

 

CRITIC (TRUE) REVIEW

Interception is an inconsistent mess from start to finish and the reason is very simple; it tried to do too much and it failed more than it succeeded. I won’t fault the guys behind the movie for trying though, but if you want to take a crack at something new, you’ve got to at least make sure you have a handle on it first.

Don’t go performing multiple magic tricks when you can’t even pull a rabbit out of a hat.

The problems with this movie starts from the opening scene and ends with the credits. From acting to story, this movie is rife with inconsistencies.

Let’s start from the top, shall we?
Like most mainstream action movies, the opening sequence aims to draw in the audience. It is a chance to wow and give the viewing audience a taste of what’s to come.
Sometimes it’s great and other times it is just bad.
Interception started off great but three things held it back;
bad acting, bad acting and bad acting.
The sad thing is, these “three” elements, along with other issues, run through the entirety of the movie.

To watch a movie of this caliber and see such terrible acting is a shame…but that is the case with A-list movies in Ghana.
That’s not to say Interception is only filled with bad actors. There are great actors in there who go all out (as far as their acting chops can carry them) but the rest on the other hand are the deliver-my-lines-like-a-toddler kind of actors…and it is oh so bad.

It is the kind of acting you’d expect from an X-Rated movie and not from a movie of this “class”.
The kidnapper in the opening scene is one of many bad actors in the movie and OH MY GOODNESS…there are many.

It just makes you wonder what they look out for in an actor during auditions (if they even have auditions).
It is either they hand over the role to a family/friend or look out for just anyone who can read, avoid the camera and not ask for a lot of money. It has to be one of these reasons.

Every attempt on my part to get lost in the world of interception was destroyed by these Z-Class actors.
There are terrific actors and actresses all around…but the people behind interception were too lazy to look.

Moving on!
The main story barely holds the movie together and it is actually quite surprising to realize that, in a movie categorized as an action-thriller, it was the romance between John Dumelo and Jasmine Baroudi’s characters that really stood out. It was the only part of the movie that genuinely grabbed my attention (somewhat).
The conversation was almost natural and the on-screen chemistry between the two was present…the only sad part was how abruptly it all ended. It makes me think Nina Lalwani, the writer of the story, didn’t have the time to properly resolve their story or she didn’t know how to.
It is a problem that features prominently in her story; she left so many things up in the air and expected us not to care because, as everyday-movie-goers it is our job to immediately forget about all the plot holes.

Picture this: Ama Abrebese’s character, the girlfriend of the main villain, revealed to the police she was aware of the villain’s dealings and even provided a private jet so they could travel around the world conducting their nefarious businesses. After this revelation/confession she avoids persecution and goes back home because her father is a powerful person (in another country).
She wasn’t extradited to face trial in her home country or anything…she walked away a free person.
As I think about it, I think they should have categorized Interception as “Action-Thriller-Fairytale”.

Nina Lalwani’s story is a very basic one and anyone looking for something a little more intelligent would be sorely disappointed. There are so many elements she could have thrown in there to spice up her story but I believe she didn’t want to expend too much of her brain power.

I’d have to commend the team behind the fight scenes and the gunplay. It was a delight to finally see some Hollywood-style fight sequences in Ghanaian movies…although it went on for too long.
When you start checking your watch during a fight scene in a movie then there is something very wrong somewhere.
The fight scenes weren’t bad…but JEEZ! How many hits to the head does it take for a bad guy to go down?

“No life insurance for bad guys I guess!”

Steady aim? I think not.

Steady aim? I think not.

The gunplay was great…but there is something very unnatural about shooting a gun without any bullet casings falling out or being ejected. If as a final decision, the team behind the movie went with “after effects” to simulate gunfire, why then couldn’t they have used the same process to add the ejected bullet casings?

“If you aim for realism, go for it.
Don’t make us question it.”

In conclusion, Interception is a fluff movie on every level. Pay even a sliver of attention and the huge cracks start to show…but if you truly want to enjoy this movie, I suggest shutting off your brain for about 100 minutes, because zoning out is the only way to enjoy it.

There are too many things that take you out of the experience and that is not a good thing for a movie with this many problems.
You forgive one mistake and before you recover from the previous blunder, something else pops up…and that is a trend in Interception.

In the end, interception tried to blend too many genres with marginal success.

★★☆☆☆ (2/5)

 

NB: All things considered, interception was a nice effort…I just don’t believe it took 2 years to make though.
3 – 6 months? Maybe.
2 years? No way.

PS: Oh yeah…Jeffery Forson, as an actor I believe you need more facial expressions.
The scowl and the smile gets old pretty fast.

Dumsor: A Chinese legacy

I have many tales to tell but boy have I got a roaring good yarn.
This looks to be the biggest conspiracy in the country since Anas busted the judges.

It’s already been established that the Ghanaian government always looks out for number one but recent discoveries have thoroughly enlightened me:
Ghana is indeed looking out for number one but they invited China to the party.

Please don’t get confused. This is indeed a post about the “almost-over” power crisis but trust me, this is so much better than what you’ve read thus far.

This Dumsor catastrophe has ruined more businesses than…well…anything.
If it were a person, it would be dead, resurrected and killed again (repeat indefinitely) until every angry person in Ghana gets a piece of the action.
Babies excluded…cos, no one wants a murderous baby!

The truth behind this Dumsor wahala is actually far worse than originally reported…so prepare yourself for it.

The endless promises (go here or here) were all cover-ups to the true reason behind the protracted power outages in the country.
Simply put: Ghana is in league with China…and they are both profiting from our power issues.

Ignorance is Bliss” they always say but Ghana doesn’t need this bliss.
Why? Well because, the power outages could have been completely resolved two years ago.

Don’t be surprised for I shall soon enlighten you.

The terrible news is, there’s actually no Dumsor.
No electricity problems…and contrary to the lies being spread about, Ghana has both the resources and the infrastructure to provide enough electricity to feed itself plus two more countries.

So then, the question must be asked;
Why this Dumsor and why is the government lying to us (Ghanaians)?

The answer is remarkably simple, yet weighty in its implications:
It is because of China.

Let me explain:
China is such a great and industrious (influential) country, and every other country wants to be at least associated with them…by any means necessary.
From military assistance to manufacturing warehouses, china has something for EVERYBODY.

Therefore, when a country that powerful makes a seemingly simple request, any country in question will do whatever it takes to stay on good terms with the great China.

So what does that have to do with Ghana and the Dumsor crisis?
Everything.
You see, Ghana was in a bit of a pickle back then (…and it still is):
It needed a lot of help from our Asian Giant but alas, it had absolutely nothing to reciprocate with. Absolutely nothing.
Well, not until China finally came forward with their demand(s): a dumping site (more on that later).

The thing is, China is a manufacturing powerhouse and they have goods in EVERY part of the globe.

I bet Eskimos use made-in-China igloos.

They make great (…and not-so-great) products and sell them all over, but recent trends show that people, especially westerners, aren’t clamoring for their products as much as they used to…basically because they want well-known brands that won’t break up upon first contact.
It’s that simple.

So what does China do with its never-ending supply of cheap (and inferior) products?
OH! They daintily waltz over to an aid-desperate country, promise to offer ‘em aid and then, “BOOM!!”, dump all their “unwanted” products in that country.
It’s not as if they have unused warehouses in China…so don’t blame them for taking initiative.
The goods have to end up somewhere and truth be told, Africa is the preferred dumpsite.

Honestly, the relationship between Ghana, China and Dumsor is quite interesting:
Ghana needs foreign aid to properly function;
China can give said aid but desperately need a place to dump its less-than-stellar products;
And Dumsor? Well Duh! Because Ghanaians love it.

Thus, this was the deal:
China stepped forward and offered Ghana all the aid it wanted and in return, Ghana would prolong the Dumsor and afford China the opportunity to use Ghana as an open warehouse.

Why make such a deal with Ghana?
Because they discovered a distinct correlation between Dumsor and the buying behavior of the average Ghanaian;
throughout the previous Dumsor saga, research discovered that Ghanaians bought more gadgets to tide them over as they endured the blackouts…and those gadgets were decidedly more inferior Chinese gadgets than anything else.
So putting two and one together, the Chinese were like,
“OK, you know what? You want aid and we want a place to unload our electronic goods (*wink*).
We have a proposition for you;
prolong your Dumsor, receive our gadgets…and then get all the ‘aids’ you want.”

Who is Ghana to say “NO”?
It was a no-brainer really.

If you think about it now, I am pretty sure you have at least noticed the abnormally high rate at which Chinese gadgets have invaded Ghana since this season of Dumsor premiered.
From powerbank phones (X-TIGI anyone?) to the weird USB-Radio-Bluetooth-MemoryCard Reader-Speaker anomalies.

I tell you this, in the past two years alone, more Chinese gadgets/devices have been sold that far exceed the Ghana population.

At least we can enjoy steady power for a while…till the elections are over.
Just don’t throw away your gadgets just yet.
Pfft!! Who am I kidding? …they won’t last that long to begin with. Just start saving up.

So, there you have it!
The shocking story of the century…but please take it easy on Ghana OK?
She might be 58 years old but she’s still taking huge baby steps.

 

 

 

DISCLAIMER: This blog post is entirely fictitious, therefore any and all resemblance to a person or place is PURELY AND UTTERLY coincidental.

 

PS: If this fantastical post truly happened, what would your reaction be?
Sound off in the comments.

Gasmillah is a cheapskate (AKA…Stingy or Chisel)

I’ve never been one for Ghanaian local music; it is instrumentally monotonous, lyrically bland and totally devoid of any emotion. Ghanaian musicians have a proclivity for following the guy ahead but never really forging a unique path. Thus, the Ghanaian music scene is cluttered with very generic and same-sounding songs from all genres.
…to each his own right?

My stance on this subject won’t change…but there’ve been some few songs that have drawn out my inner Ghanaian…and one such song is Gasmilla’s Telemo.
To be quite honest, Telemo is a real joy to listen to but mostly because of its chorus.
The rest of the song isn’t half bad but it is the chorus that kept reeling me in.
It is nothing remarkably extraordinary but what can I say, it makes me wanna sing along;
If any musician can achieve that in any song, then that is a win in my books.

Moving on; prior to listening to Telemo I knew practically nothing about Gasmilla…(I believe we’ve established I’m a hermit)…but after a rather short search on the internet, I found all I needed about the Telemo Man.
Apparently he has been around far longer than I first thought, released other hit songs (3 points) and is somehow an alumnus of Wesley Grammar.

Gasmilla

“Hard work and Determination really does pay off”

After the success of Telemo (plus the fame), Gasmilla has been wounding people with a GH¢40,000 – GH¢80,000 appearance/performance fee.
Is that outrageous? Maybe.
Does he deserve it? Ummm…probably, but I guess it is his sworn duty as a sane Ghanaian musician to make as much money possible before his Telemo train grinds to a halt…because, unlike Sarkodie, a lot of Ghanaian musicians desperately try to stay financially afloat with their one-hit-songs. When the buzz fades away, they try recapturing the lightning in their bottles but when that doesn’t work, they either go into hiding with what’s left of their money or reinvent their music careers; Shatta Wale anybody?

Anyway, Gasmilla is making it “big” but his recent attempts at creating another hit song have so far been middling…but hey, he’s trying. I can’t fault him for that.

Now, on the 31st of October 2015, Gasmilla was invited to the Wesley Grammar Homecoming celebrations and was made a celebrity judge at the Talent Show.
After a very bizarre dance-off between four groups, the winner was picked.
Oh yeah…they danced off to Telemo.
I bet you didn’t see that coming.

IMG-20151025-WA003

The Wess-G HomeComing.

It was at this point Gasmilla irreparably broke my heart. He went up to the stage, sang a very off-key line from the Telemo chorus and then delivered a not-so-charismatic speech.
It went a little something like; “I admire talent and I always try my best to invest into the lives of anybody talented. It is because of this I’m giving GH¢200 to the winners.”
(Paraphrased…but very accurate.)

Obviously, the kids were excited (no surprises there) but I was so shocked I lost some (a lot) respect for Gasmilla.
I wonder how much he would have invested if he thought they didn’t have talent.
In this economy what can GH¢200 do?
Maybe they can get matching socks. That way we can easily tell they are all from one dancing group.
Or maybe get a celebratory fufu from Aunty Mansah’s chopbar.

GH¢40,000 – GH¢80,000 a show and our magnanimous Mr. Gasmilla dishes out GH¢200?
Unless he’s mismanaging his money, he has no excuse and quite honestly, GH¢200 is an insult.

“All os a fudden”, Telemo angers me every time I hear it.

Gasmilla, I’ve never been a fan and if I were, I’d chase you around town with a signpost reading, “You are a cheapskate!!”
Be a better role model and don’t be cheap.

Thank You.

PS: …You just know the kids won’t see a pesewa of that GH¢200.

NB: It appears Gasmilla is trying to make amends for his folly with “Gasmilla Father Christmas Show”.
The premise of this “show” is pretty simple; “put smiles on the faces of little children on the 26th of December, 2015 (Boxing Day).”
Children who participate in the games (held at Efua Sutherland Park) will win prizes ranging from bicycles to T-shirts…with one lucky child winning a scholarship to any school desired. Whether that child has the brains or not is completely up in the air.
For all its worth, I am glad he is “giving back” to society…even though he is gonna demand a gate fee for the “Christmas Show”.
Such irony.

‘The Martian’ in Global Cinemas.

Global-Cinemas_Logo_Final-01

So I recently watched “The Martian” in 3D in Global Cinemas (Weija) and it was spectacularly awesome. I will give my very short review in a bit, but first let me pat Global Cinemas on the back.

They are doing a very good job and this boy is impressed.

They’ve taken the best ingredients of the killer cinema experience, mixed it up and well…brewed up the “killer cinema experience”.
They’ve got the location, the price (that hits the sweet spot right on the jaw), the great service, the sound, the 3D…and did I mention the sound?

Gosh I love the sounds in the cinema.

So, Global Cinemas. Chances are you haven’t heard much about them and if you have, good on you because, aside their severely unimaginative billboards I heard practically nothing about them. That basically means one of two things; either I am a reclusive hermit or Global Cinemas didn’t pump enough money into advertising. For the sake of argument, let’s just say the latter is the reason for my lack of knowledge.

Unless there’s a law in Ghana that limits advertising for movie houses, I don’t see why Global Cinemas is flicking around glass marbles when a powerhouse like Silverbird is dropping metal balls.

“Global Cinemas, never underestimate the power of advertising…in whatever shape or form.”

Let’s leave it at that. Hopefully, they will come for my services. I work for an advertising agency y’know! *Subtle Suggestion* **wink**

Anywho, Global Cinemas has now taken root in Functions (Weija), the same building that once housed Silverbird. They (Silverbird) left Functions because of West Hills and almost a year down the line, I’m glad they did.

With Global Cinemas now in charge of the outfit, the interior and exterior have seen some slight changes. On the exterior, there’s now a “Global Cinemas” nameplate and a new entrance. Nothing too shabby.
Step inside though and you will soon realize Global Cinemas wants to cozy you up.
To put it subtly, there’s a lounge in the lobby now, and whiles that might not seem like a big deal, you should know the previous occupants offered no sitting area (save for the videogame area) for waiting customers.

This invariably drove out the very patient customers into the clutches of neighboring fast-food restaurants…and these restaurants will gladly let you sit and wait only after you’ve placed an order.

“Hmmm! In hindsight, I guess it was a fruitful “partnership”.

Talking about fast-food restaurants around Global Cinemas…well, let’s just say they are not in short supply; from Starbites to Wichburger, there’s a place for almost everyone.

So all things considered, I think the lounge is a welcome addition even though I doubt I’ll ever need it, since I am an on-the-dot kinda guy.

The service isn’t bad either although I fear employee-complacency might ruin that part of the experience. This happens way too often in Ghana.

“A new place opens and all the attendants can’t stop smiling at you or fussing all over you…like a bunch of guys fawning over a fresh girl in a new school.
A few months down the road though and no one cares about you or what you want; they will serve you when they serve you…so chill out!”

I am not calling doom on Global Cinemas but no surprises here when that happens.
We are in Ghana after all.

INTO THE CINEMA
The structure of the cinema itself hasn’t changed and I don’t know if that is good or bad, so mum’s the word.

One area has changed though, and that is the sound.

It might be new speakers, different equalizer presets or a mere volume increase. All I’ll say is ‘Global Cinemas, thank you for whatever you did’.

When Silverbird once occupied the place, I’d always complain about the sound…heck! I still do (West Hills and Accra Mall).
It was too tame, too subtle and way too flat. It almost felt as though they didn’t want us to enjoy the movie. Their sounds never reached cinema-level awesomeness.
Global Cinemas on the other hand is trying to blow out and destroy your eardrums…and I love it. That is how it is supposed to be.

Bad movie or not, I want to exit a cinema knowing I got my monies worth and that is what Global Cinemas accomplishes with the sounds.

With that said, the overall cinematic experience of Global Cinemas is but a few fist pumps away from perfection and since perfection is an elusive unicorn, we better let it go and jump into the negatives plaguing Global Cinemas.

“Time for the negatives! I love me some negatives.”

 

As good as Global Cinemas is at the moment, they have some issues desperately begging for attention and the biggest offender is their lackluster movie lineup.

There’s only so much good pricing and exceptional sound can do, and the sad thing is, Global Cinemas isn’t doing much to impress us (as far as movies are concerned).
Yeah you will find a blockbuster movie in there once in a while…but take out that movie and the lineup gets severely anemic.

“I speak for a lot of people when I say we need more blockbuster movies.”

If it’s a battle of movie rights, beat Silverbird; it’s that simple.

Variety is the spice of life but in this case, variety gives Global Cinemas more customers and more money.

Next on my list of negatives is the uneven shades in the projection screen (in the 3D screening room). It is a minor niggle at best but it’s something that can’t be unseen…and once you are aware, it detracts from the entire experience.
More so for a 3D movie where the entire movie experience is predicated on the viewer thinking they are a part of it. The illusion is thus broken when the viewer is always conscious of the uneven nature of the screen. It is very jarring. It needs to be fixed pronto.

All these issues are easily fixable (by my reasoning), so if after a week or two I find them still present, disappointment will sink in.

So that’s that for Global Cinemas; Great place, great ambiance, great pricing…just beef up your movie lineup, fix your uneven projection screen and presto, all will be well.

Now, let’s do my review of The Martian…but you know what, go watch it and we will discuss it. Hehe :).

Let me know when you are done.

PS: The Global Cinemas’ website and mobile app feel broken. Empty pages, really old movie posters and broken links are the ones I care about…and yeah, a portion of the website leads to Silverbird’s promotions page (click on any of the three squares).
Jeez Global Cinemas, you can do better.

How the National Service Scheme is Failing GHANA!

ghana_national_service_scheme_gnssThere won’t be any fancy intro…no word-plays or puns. I’ll jump straight to the point;
The National Service Scheme is a big mess and a major failure to Ghana.

It baffles me how little Ghanaians in power care about Ghana. They spew such hypocritical nonsense about how they are trying their best to make situations better but we know they are just yanking our chains. From Ministers to Presidents, no one truly cares about Ghana anymore.

We are down, they keep kicking us but we are just too numb to even care.

Give greedy people power they’ve always wanted for eons and what you get is the Ghanaian Government (Past and Present). We get heavier in the mud whiles they get richer and fatter in their penthouse suites.

There’s mismanagement (ECG, Doctors and Cedi) in every facet of the Ghanaian Government but my area of concern for this post is the mismanagement of the National Service Scheme.

“How is the National Service Scheme mismanaged?” you say!
The recent scandals speak volumes. Go here, here and here.

The potential of the National Service Scheme is particularly outstanding, but the people at the top only want more money and further gain perfection in the art of Nepotism.

Each year the Ghanaian Government has over 70000 able-bodied people at its disposal through the National Service Scheme. These people have atop their generic skillset, specialized skills they’ll “use” later on in life. So, why is this goldmine of resources wasted every single year by the government.

Instead of a more targeted approach at posting National Service personnel, the Government covers both eyes and let the stones fall where they may (albeit with some exceptions).
Students with nepotistical family members in the Government rest easy because, they know “fate” is on their side. The unfortunate ones on the other hand invariably get the short end of the stick.

That is basically the story of the NSS;
the “connected” get great placements whiles the linear…well…they get the hard life in villages that have virtually no cellphone reception.

That’s hardly fair!

The men and women who run government organizations do so as they see fit because they feel no real obligation or accountability to us Ghanaians. Well, truth be told, we don’t really expect much from them either…and thus, they don’t care to work more efficiently.

The Pressure no dey!

We’ve been fed up to the back teeth for so long we just don’t give a hoot no more.

It’s been said and it’s been proven that Ghanaian Government workers are lazy and show an extreme lack of initiative, and when they do, it is to fatten up their coffers.

The NSS under the “NSS Act” aims to compulsorily give students the opportunity to make/give meaningful contributions to the government, but at the end of their service, these students are left with an overwhelming sense of void since they give back nothing substantial to their country. All because of poor placements.

Goto the official NSS website and they throw such nice descriptions at you;
“…it has its origins in the desire and demands of Ghanaian Youth for early opportunities to participate in shaping the destiny of our country.”

Yet, year after year the impact of the NSS on the country is negligible at best.
If you take the time to research and examine the notable accomplishments of the vaunted National Service Scheme, you’d be hard-pressed to find anything actually noteworthy.

Talk indeed is cheap and in the end, these NSS personnel have been reduced to just sanitary workers (Go here and here).

With Great Power comes Little Responsibility (to Ghanaians).”

Dear Ghana Government, I don’t understand why my beloved, a petroleum engineer, should be posted to a rural area as a teacher, when her skill-set would be better utilized if she were posted to an industry where she can make actual contributions to the industry and the country as a whole.

If you do admit we are all made for different professions, why then do you tie our hands and push us into dark pits?

WHAT THEN ARE MY RECOMMENDATIONS?

Sorry, RECOMMENDATION; I will give only one area a more targeted approach in deploying personnel will see great results, and if the government likes the idea, they can think of many more…because in the end, they don’t pay me.

MY RECOMMENDATION:
Government can re-purpose old facilities and outfit them with hundreds/thousands of desktop computers.
Conversely, they can dip a hand into an unknown fund and put up such a structure.
We know they can.

The configuration will be nothing fancy; Pentium 4 processors, 1gb of RAM and 80gb HDD.
To reduce the load on these computers, only one suite of application will be installed on them: Microsoft Office.

At these facilities spread across major cities in Ghana, shortlisted people on the National Service Scheme will be given the seemingly simple task of typing out records kept by all relevant Government agencies.
Since the possibility of encountering confidential information is relatively high, anyone who is even remotely involved will be given Non-Disclosure Agreements (NDA’s) to sign.
If severely confidential information must be typed out, it can be assigned to carefully selected and screened individuals.
That way, they can effectively muzzle any Anas Aremeyaw Anas wannabees in the facility.

At periodic intervals, the typed info (digital copy) will be collected by the relevant Government Agencies and then backed up online.

Even with the mind-boggling advancements in the technological sphere, it just beats my mind how Government agencies in Ghana still rely on “Pen&Paper”.
Mountains of handwritten records plague every part of Government.
How do they back up the information? Well, they don’t.
And when the fires come…and they always come, they lament on the wealth of information lost to the fires.

But why should that be?
As evidenced by the recent floods, it quite clear that Ghana does not plan for the worst-case-scenario.
We just go with the flow.

The sad part is, the big men all lay down plans that can actually work but when power corrupts them, everything is tossed into the bin until they need votes.

Ghana Government please save the trees…and at least pretend as though you give two hoots about the environment.
Also, you can use my simple but effective example as a template, then base future NSS postings on it, instead of your archaic system.

Cos, in the end, I believe this approach can give the NSS a fresh perspective on handling postings and a renewed interest from  those undertaking it or are yet to.

 

PS: I’d really like to believe the Government thought of something similar to what I am proposing but were just too lazy in its implementation.
(Pls don’t sue me!) 😀